Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Homes near UNC’

4100 Five Oaks 13

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Beware of the HOA

Ok, so I’ll admit it, my relationship with the animal that is the HOA management company is a bit of Jekyll and Hyde or love at times and dislike immensely at other times. I understand that the role of the HOA is to step in where government can’t get the job done, but of late I’ve seen a whole lot of abuse.

Most management companies charge buyers a fee at settlement so that the management company can update their records with the new name, address, telephone number and email of the buyer purchasing the property.  I think all of this is important information to have on hand when managing a community. The fees charged range from $45 to $200.  In my opinion anything over $50 is outrageous and gouging. Especially since many HOA management companies never really get around to actually updating the information. This leaves me questioning; exactly what is it that the HOA management companies are charging for?  I think that if buyer information isn’t being updated that’s tantamount to theft or willful negligence.

There is an association here in Durham that rigorously enforces that trash cans be removed from curbside the day of collection.  That’s fair and right; what isn’t fair and what isn’t right is that this particular HOA management company has Durham Neighborhood Services; a city department funded by taxpayers, come onto private property and drive the neighborhood’s private streets and tag unit owners and tenants who neglect to bring their cans in by sundown on the day of collection. If its private property the city has no business enforcing HOA rules; the duly paid property manager needs to do their job and get out there and can patrol for trash cans.  I did manage to set the city enforcer right on this one with a digital photograph of the “private road” sign after he insisted to me that he would never venture onto private property to enforce city code.

Finally, there is the strong hand weak hand paradigm which I see as pervasive in associations and their management companies. In my neighborhood typically parking infractions bring down an iron fisted strong hand on the transgressor. However, leave your trash cans out at the curb 365 days a year and you are treated with a feather light weak hand. Replace doors with permission but wait a brief time to paint them; hard handed chastisement; yet replace a front door with a non-conforming door, neglect to get permission; stall and delay in finally getting permission; refuse to remove the non-compliant door; weak hand so much so that years later the offending door is still up and no one is doing anything about it.

So what’s the solution for those buying real estate in communities with an HOA and HOA management company? Educate yourself; know that if an association was formed decades ago that the covenants and rules of governance might be weak, outdated and inadequate. Like anything else, time has a way of healing and adapting to deficiencies. Read the neighborhood covenants and rules and review the manager’s contract. If time permits, attend a board meeting or review meeting minutes before buying. Drive the neighborhood at different days and different times; observe lawns, gardens, garbage cans, parking and what you observe happening day to day. Once you buy, send your information to the community manager and insist that they acknowledge that your information has been updated; failing to do so may cost you thousands of dollars. Lastly, once you close on your property, get involved with the board of directors, know your stuff and don’t be afraid to be a squeaky wheel. Many boards and managers are acutely aware that their residents are complacent and operate from that premise.

Read Full Post »

After twenty two years of selling homes you’d think that I’d seen it all.  Maybe? Close?  I don’t know. I am still amazed at what happens.

In spite of the fact that as both a buyer’s agent and listing agent I endeavor to impart clear expectations to buyers, buyer’s agents and home owners; sometimes I’m just plain surprised by what happens or doesn’t happen when a property is shown.  So, I’ll attempt to impart some wisdom here in this forum.

To home buyers here are some common sense do’s when viewing another person’s home. Keep your children under control if they’re looking at homes with you. It is not acceptable for young children to flop on furniture, this includes beds. Please prevent your children from opening cupboards, refrigerators, playing with toys, hiding in closets and under beds or turning on electronic devises.  This would also include “disco lighting” he house by rapidly turning off and on lights.  It is also very bad form to allow anyone in your party to bring food, drinks and snacks into a property being viewed.  This would include you. Please leave pets alone too, many pets bite or scratch when faced with strangers.   Finally, don’t use the bathroom; I know that this is a tough one given the excitement of viewing homes but it is just bad manners to use the loo without permission.

Agents working with buyers and showing them homes should be in tune to what their clients are doing and should know their stuff. Get your chin up out of the MLS data or off your tablet and use memory and top of mind techniques to tell the buyer about the property. Start your showings by removing your shoes, if you model this behavior your buyers will follow suit. Make sure all doors are locked when you’re finished showing and LEAVE THE HOME EXACTLY AS YOU FOUND IT. If lights were on, leave them on, if off then turn them back off. Educate your clients about acceptable behaviors and be aware that many owners use recording devices to review what’s happening in their home whilst they’re away.  Finally a good buyer’s agent should provide brief and impersonal feedback after showings. I find that a simple statement telling whether the buyer is interested or not will suffice. Good listing agents really don’t want to read nitpicky personally motivated mess about what you think and especially what you can’t qualify with data.

Home sellers should ensure that valuables are tucked away and out of site. Horizontal surfaces, closets and cupboards should be clutter free and the home in general should be well organized.  Even the brightest of homes should burn lights like a commercial for Duke Energy. Heating and air conditioning should be set at comfortable levels and the water should be on, just in case someone uses the loo, even though they shouldn’t.  Owners should also freely share any transgressions as outlined previously in this post along with anything else that’s amiss with their listing agent.

Yes, I’ve seen a lot; buyers attempting to change a diaper on a dining room table, children hiding under beds, home owners hiding under beds and in closets, folks showing up to view a home with an open cup of coffee and lots of muddy shoes. I’ve been bitten by a cat, chased by a Doberman pincer, terrified by a snake inside a home on a stair step and walked in on folks behaving intimately even though I had a confirmed appointment. Some good common sense can make the home buying and selling experience a happy one.  Interested in buying or selling a home?  Call or email me.

Read Full Post »

Image

1515 E. Franklin Street #18 Chapel Hill NC 27514

Everything and we mean EVERYTHING is new in this Winchester Court condominium located on Franklin Street in Chapel Hill NC offered at $178,000.  Step out of your door and hop the bus and be at UNC in ten short minutes. Stroll across the street for shopping at Whole Foods or a cup of coffee at Caribou.

The property itself is amazing. Inside you’ll find new hardwood flooring, new kitchen cabinets, new counter tops, new fixtures, new paint, new HVAC, new carpet, new flooring, new baths and new stainless steel appliances. The combination living room/dining room has a wall of windows which looks out onto the woods and a balcony provides additional space for outdoor enjoyment. This home is a Franklin Street address but #18 is at the rear of the building.

Interested in learning more? Visit www.TeamMichaelSullivan.com or phone us at 919-608-2372 to schedule your private tour of this two bedroom, 1.5 bath condominium located in the heart of Chapel Hill.

Read Full Post »

4100 Five Oaks Dr. #31

This townhouse does NOT back up to Old Chapel Hill Rd. and has amazing views of the woods behind. The rear walls of this home are virtually all glass inviting outdoors inside.

Image

4100 Five Oaks Dr. #31 has been beautifully updated. There are hardwoods and laminate floors on both the first and the second floors.  The kitchen has been updated with newer appliances, white cabinets and the pass through window to the dining room has been enlarged.

In many of the rooms you’ll find new lighting fixtures and fresh paint.  The heating and cooling systems have been updated too.

Expansive decking and porches at the front and rear of the home add abundant exterior living space.  This home is also a short walk to the Five Oaks Club, the lake and to shopping.

Here you’ll find 2 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, office, living room, dining room, kitchen, breakfast room and lots of storage.

Care to learn more?  Call or text us today, 919-608-2372, email us, Michael@TeamMichaelSullivan.com  or visit www.TeamMichaelSullivan.com

Read Full Post »

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


The mystery of real estate…

So, I thought that I’d go a little wide today with respect to topic and focus in on exactly what it is that I do. I can certainly take on two roles as a REALTOR. I can be a listing agent; with my sign in the yard in front of a home and that of a buyer agent; introducing buyers to homes that may fit their criteria, which sounds simple doesn’t it?
So let’s break the two roles apart because they are very different which makes my choice of career very enjoyable and recently challenging. I will tackle this topic over several installments.

Listing agent:
• My primary responsibility is to determine what, if anything, are the value added features that would induce a customer to purchase any given home.
To that end, I must:
• Assist home sellers in pricing their homes by analyzing current market conditions. These conditions are both micro (local) and macro (non-local) factors that might affect home selling and buying.

These factors might include:
o Interest rates
o Employment
o Holidays
o War
o Market saturation
o Condition of the subject property
o Factors directly affecting marketability of the subject property.

 Overall neighborhood appeal
 Issues in proximity to the property
• Busy roadways
• Huge shopping centers
• Airports
• Rail road tracks
• Neighborhood “collectors” with junk cars, couches and perhaps even chickens in the yard.
and many other factors.
• Expose a seller’s home/property to the broadest spectrum of buyers possible
o Provide detailed and accurate information to those buyers and their agents.
• Report what the market reaction is to the property seller and then offer potential solutions to overcome stated objections.
Really that’s it in a nutshell. There are many tools in my arsenal to meet the ends of a fairly good listing agent. The challenge in the last two years has been an all but non-existent home buying consumer which has given me little if anything to report to my home sellers.

Next time…Helping Home Buyers, Buy.

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: